ACADEMICS

Special Education

Providing ongoing support as needed for exceptional learners.
CHECK IT OUT
program overview

Special Education

program overview

Do you have further questions?
Please contact Maggie Ducharme at 519-734-6444 ext 3026
or
maggie_ducharme@wecdsb.on.ca

Programs and Services: An Overview

 The Special Education Department at Villanova provides ongoing support as needed for exceptional learners through our Life Skills Program and the Learning Enrichment Program. We also assist in overseeing the Locally Developed/Workplace Program and monitor the progress of exceptional students in the Applied and Academic Programs.

Life Skills Program

 The Life Skills Program focuses on developing basic literacy, numeracy, life skills, social skills and vocational skills for students who have developmental disabilities. The goal for these students is to make them as independent and self-sufficient as possible upon their graduation from Secondary school. The life skills student works towards attaining a Certificate of Achievement or the Ontario Secondary School Certificate. Students can take a combination of integrated courses and non-credit Life Skills courses, also known as K courses. Vocational skills are introduced in the in-school World of Work component of the Life Skills Program, followed by a community-based component starting in Grade 11. Educational Assistants provide physical, behavioral, social and academic support in all areas of the Life Skills Program as directed by the Department Head of Special Education and Life Skills Teacher.

Locally Developed/Workplace Program

This program offers courses for students with Individual Education Plans who require modified curriculum. The focus of this program is to improve the students literacy, numeracy, organizational skills and work skills through credited courses. Students are enrolled in a combination of locally developed courses and through their IEP receive modifications in all Open level courses. In Grade 11 &12, students have the opportunity to take Workplace Co-op in order to attain vocational skills to enter the workforce after high school. Academic assistance for these students are provided by our Learning Enrichment Teachers and Educational Assistants in the classroom and/or the Learning Enrichment classroom.

Applied and Academic Program

Students who are taking courses at the Applied or Academic level and have an Individual Education Plan or Accommodation Log may also access the Learning Enrichment Program with our Learning Enrichment Teacher for learning support.

The following are tips for maximizing your son/daughter’s potential for success in secondary school:

– If you have any questions/concerns of a general nature, please phone the Special Education Department as we are your primary contact.

– If you have any questions/concerns about a particular class/course, please phone the teacher first.

– Please be patient. It takes a few weeks for everyone to get settled into a routine. Our department needs time to understand the needs of your son/daughter and they need to get used to their new environment.

– If there is a change in your son/daughter’s medication, please notify the Special Education Department as soon as possible.

– If there are any new developments in your son/daughter’s life that could affect his/her academic progress, please let us know.

– MOST IMPORTANTLY: studies show that parents who are involved with their child’s academic career find that students tend to do better in school. Be sure to attend all Parent/Teacher Interview nights and call if there are ever any concerns/issues.

academic applied programs
Academic and Applied

The Special Education Department provides assistance as required to students taking courses at the Applied level who:

  • have been formally identified through the IPRC process
  • have a formal Individual Education Plan (IEP)
  • have an Accommodation Log
  • have received Special Education Support in elementary school
  • have been identified by a classroom teacher as needing temporary support

***Assistance is provided by Special Education teaching staff in the Learning Enrichment Centre.

 In order to be successful at the Applied level, students should be achieving a Level 2 in the grade 8 curriculum without modifications. These students continue to be accommodated according to their IEP and Resource Assistance is available as needed.

Grade 9 Courses:

Compulsory:
English – ENG 1D0
Mathematics – MFM 1W
Science – SNC 1W
Geography- CGC 1D
Religion – HRE 100
French – FSF 1D
*(or if exemption granted the student will take Learning Strategies GLE 100)
Electives:
Choose 1 Arts Course – Music (AMU 100)
Visual Art (AVI 100)
Drama (ADA 100)
Dance (ATC 100)
Choose Physical Education (PPL 10M/F) or Integrated Tech. (TTI 100)

After Grade 9:

Students at the Applied level continue to take courses at this level in Grade 10. In Grades 11 and 12, students move into the College level preparation courses. They are encouraged to develop functional employability skills through:
*Co-operative Education/Work Experience
*School-to-work transition programs such as the 3 credit or 4 credit Co-op package, OYAP, MOYAP
An increased focus on technological courses is also recommended in the Construction, Manufacturing, Horticulture, Hospitality, Transportation, Design areas.
It is also possible for students to move into the Workplace courses for Mathematics and/or English after grade 10 with focus on technology courses and work experience.

After Secondary School:

Students who have attained an OSSD with Applied/College level courses have several options available to them, such as:
*Entry into the workforce
*Apprenticeship
*College

The Special Education Department provides assistance as required to students taking courses at the Academic level who:
*have been formally identified through the IPRC process and have a formal Individual Education Plan (IEP)

Assistance is provided by Special Education teaching staff in the Learning Enrichment Centre.

academic applied programs
locally developed program
Locally Developed/Workplace

The Locally Developed/Workplace Program is designed to meet the needs of the student who requires modified curriculum expectations. These students have achieved at a level 1 or below in their grade 8 year or have had modified expectations in Language Arts and/or Mathematics as outlined on their Report Card and Individual Education Plan.

In order to take the courses in this program, the student:

-must have a formal Individual Education Plan (IEP) or Accommodation Log- unless “transferred” from Grade 8.
-requires modified curriculum expectations.
-exhibits Literacy/language arts level: grade 3-5
-exhibits Math/numeracy level: grade 3-5 (not able to do integers, algebra, fractions without full assistance)
-should be accessing support in the elementary system by the Learning Enrichment Teacher on a regular basis.
-should be exempted from taking French.

What Courses are Offered at the Locally Developed/Workplace level?

Villanova offers a complete program for students at this level. All courses are based on a modified curriculum. Accommodations are provided according to the student’s IEP especially in the Open Level courses. At Villanova, it is assumed that all students at this level will work towards an Ontario Secondary School Diploma. The courses offered in this program count as credits toward the OSSD or OSSC.

Grade 9 Courses:

– English (Locally Developed) and Learning Strategies – ENG 1L0/GLS 100
*full year course: student earns 2 credits Mathematics (Locally Developed) – MAT 1L0
– Science (Locally Developed) – SNC 1L0
– Religion (Open) – HRE 100
– Geography (Modified Applied) – CGC 1PS
– Art: Music (AMU 100), Visual Arts (AVI 100), or Drama (ADA 100)
– Physical Education: PPL 10M (male), PPL 10F (female)
– Business and Technology: TTI 100

*all Locally Developed and Modified Applied class sizes are capped at 16 students each.
**student have access to the Learning Enrichment Centre for all courses.
***students may have additional assistance from an Educational Assistant in these courses.

Please note: GLS 100 replaces French for exemption purposes
Students who are stronger in a particular academic area may take courses at the Applied level in that area while taking the remainder of his/her courses at the Workplace level. This is upon the recommendation of the elementary school in consultation with the parent/guardian.
Upon the recommendation of the grade 9 teacher and the Department Head of Special Education, a student may choose to upgrade to the Applied level. This is done in consultation with parent/guardian.

After Grade 9:

Students at the Locally Developed level continue to take courses at this level in Grade 10. In Grades 11 and 12, students move into the Workplace level courses. They are encouraged to develop functional employability skills through:
*Co-operative Education/Work Experience
*School-to-work transition programs such as the 3 credit or 4 credit Co-op package
An increased focus on technological courses is also recommended in the Construction, Manufacturing, Horticulture, Hospitality, Transportation, Design areas.

After Secondary School:

Students who have attained an OSSD with Workplace level courses have several options available to them, such as:
*Direct entry into the workforce (sometimes as a result of a successful Co-op placement)
*Apprenticeship: Assistant Cook, Construction, Auto Body Repair etc.
*Vocational certificate program at St. Clair College
*General Arts and Science program at St. Clair College

At the parent/guardian’s request, the Department Head of Special Education can meet with the student and parent to provide assistance in transition planning.

locally developed program
lifeskills
Life Skills
* Note some photos were taken pre-COVID.
What is the Life Skills Program?

            The Life Skills Program is designed to provide alternative curriculum for students who have an intellectual/developmental disability and/or a significant physical disability. The focus of the Life Skills Program is on the development of basic literacy, numeracy, life skills, social skills and vocational skills. The goal of the program is to allow the student to become as independent and self-sufficient as possible upon graduation from secondary school.

Who is it for?

The Life Skills Program is for students who may have been previously ISA funded with an intellectual/developmental disability and/or a significant physical disability.
Students who have a formal Individual Education Plan (IEP).
Students should be identified through the IPRC process.
Students whose literacy/numeracy skills are at a primary level or below.
Students who have had alternate curriculum presented to them in the elementary school in conjunction with the Learning Enrichment Teacher.
Students who are exempted from taking French.
Students who will not be successful at passing the Ontario Secondary School Grade 10 Literacy Test.
Students who will attain a Certificate of Accomplishment
Students who may attain an Ontario Secondary School Certificate (OSSC)

What courses do students in the Life Skills Program take?

 Students in the Life Skills Program mostly take K coded courses. All K coded courses are non-credit courses that offer alternate curriculum based on the students level of functioning and ability. Students may be integrated into regular courses to promote inclusion or they may be taught in segregated Life Skills courses in order to focus on specific skills. If a student has the ability to attain regularly coded credits in any subject, they will be given that opportunity. The credits earned will be put towards the attainment of the Certificate of Accomplishment or OSSC.

What are the suggested courses for a Grade 9 student?

Students in the Life Skills Program could take courses in any of the following:
Literacy: KEN ANA /B
Numeracy: KMM ANA /B
Culinary/Cooking: KHI ANA /B
Physical Education: KPF ANA /B
Art, Dance, Drama or Music: KAL ANA /B
Any Technology: KCW ANA /B
In-school Work Experience: KGW ANA /B
Religion: KHD ANA /B All K coded courses can be combined with regular classes or may be offered in a segregated setting. Educational Assistants are available to provide support in all K coded courses.

How do I fill out the Grade 9 Option Sheet?

            To fill out your son/daughters option sheet, please schedule an appointment with either the Department of Special Education or the Life Skills Teacher.

What happens to the students after Grade 9?

            Students in the Life Skills Program have the opportunity to stay in secondary school until the age 21. The focus continues on the development of basic literacy, numeracy, life skills, social skills and vocational skills with the goal of the student being as independent and self-sufficient as possible upon graduation. Vocational skills continue to be one of the main focuses of the Life Skills Program. These skills are introduced in either Grade 9 or 10 (depending on the students ability) by participating in the In-school Work Experience course. Students will perform tasks in 3 areas:
Office: shredding paper, photocopying, collecting attendance etc.
Building/Maintenance: dusting, sweeping halls, washing windows, vacuuming, recycling etc.
Cafeteria: stocking shelves, making sandwiches, baking, other food prep as assigned, wiping trays etc.

       Upon completion of these experiences, and if the student is deemed ready by the Life Skills Teacher, the student will then participate in the Community-based component of the Work Experience course beginning in Grade 11 and continuing until graduation from secondary school. Educational Assistants assist in providing on-the-job support and training as necessary. If the students are independently successful then they will continue with minimal support. All students are encouraged to try a variety of jobs in order to gain a portfolio of skills to enable them to be employable after secondary school.

What happens to the students after completion of secondary school?

Students can enter into support programs through the Association of Community Living, ODSP etc.
Students can enter the workforce on a part-time or full-time basis, with or without support depending on level of independence. Students can enter the Work Matters program offered by the Windsor-Essex Catholic District School Board. Goal and Transition planning is usually discussed at the IPRC Review meetings every April. Assistance with this is available upon request of the parent/guardian.

Additional Information Regarding the Life Skills Program:

The Life Skills room is fully equipped with:

  • 2 wheelchair accessible washrooms that each contains an electric ceiling mounted lift, electric adjustable change table and storage for personal hygiene items for students requiring it.

  • 1 physiotherapy bed with an electric ceiling mounted lift

  • a fully equipped kitchen area with all appliances

  • a fully equipped laundry area

Life Skills Classroom that contains various academic materials including computers with various software including: Kurzweil, Clicker 4, Writing with Symbols etc. Educational Assistants greet the students in the Life Skills Program at their buses in the morning and assist them in boarding the buses at the end of the day (if required). Lockers are located in the hallway directly outside the Life Skills room so that the students are adequately supervised. If students cannot use a combination lock, use of keyed locks are permissible and can be purchased by the parents. An extra key will be kept in the students file in case of loss or misplacement. Villanova is equipped with an elevator to the second floor and keys will be made available to the student by the school. Students in the Life Skills Program eat lunch in the school cafeteria or in the Life Skills room, depending on the students individual needs. Educational Assistants are on hand to provide support as needed. Food can be heated in the Life Skills room prior to lunch or purchased in the school cafeteria.

lifeskills
faq

Frequently Asked Questions

A student is taking Locally Developed/Workplace courses. Do these count towards the OSSD?

Yes! All of these courses are credited courses recognized by the Ministry of Education and count towards the OSSD.

A student is in the Locally Developed/Workplace program. Can he/she still earn an OSSD?

Yes! He/she can earn an OSSD provided they fulfill all of the requirements: 18 compulsory courses, 12 elective courses, pass the gr. 10 literacy test or course (OLC 400) and complete their 40 hours of community service.

Can students move from the Locally Developed courses to Applied if he/she is successful?

 If the student does extremely well in any of the Locally Developed courses, the classroom teacher may recommend a move to the Applied course(s) for next year. This decision is discussed in conjunction with the classroom teacher, Department Head of Special Education and most importantly, the parent/guardian.

The student is at grade level in Math but needs modifications in English. What stream should he/she be in? (Or vice versa)

Courses can be taken in different streams. All language-based courses should match streams and all Math/Science should match.

What happens if the student is exempted from French in high school?

 The principal will substitute a different compulsory course for French. This happens quite often especially for Workplace students and this does not affect their diploma. All students that are exempted from French attain the same diploma as those who take this course.

What is the Learning Strategies course?

The GLE 100 or GLS 100 course are mandatory for students in grade 9 who are either exempted from taking French or are in the Locally Developed courses. Students are taught organizational skills, note making skills, study skills and strategies for success for the gr. 10 literacy test. There is also the opportunity to complete homework and access support from a Special Education teacher for assistance in all areas of the curriculum.

faq

Contact Us.

We welcome you to contact us for more information
about any of our programs or questions you may have.

2800 North Townline Rd LaSalle ON, Canada N9H 0K3

stovadmin@gmail.com

(519) 734-6444

Follow us